Kellogg Community College


Philip Carey art exhibit runs through Oct. 27

Kellogg Community College will host an exhibit of works by California mixed-media artist Philip Carey beginning this month.

The exhibit, titled “Trashing My Art: Arting My Trash,” will run from Sept. 22 through Oct. 27 in the Eleanor R. and Robert A. DeVries Gallery in KCC’s Davidson Visual and Performing Arts Center, on campus at 450 North Ave., Battle Creek. The exhibit is free and open to the public for viewing during regular gallery hours, which are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

An opening reception, which is also free and open to the public, will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22. At 5 p.m. Carey will present an informal artist talk in the gallery. At the artist’s request, refreshments related to the artwork will be served.

Carey’s exhibit will include collage and sculptural installations created using nontraditional materials such as illustrated business envelopes, 3- by 5-inch Post-it notes, and bandages used during kidney dialysis treatments related to a successful kidney transplant, which serves as inspiration for many of the works in the exhibit.

“I see the visual artistic potential in just about everything,” Carey says. “The everyday items that pass through our lives and usually into the trash are what I use as my art media. Items such as medical packaging, prescription bottles, chocolate wrappers, dreams, meeting notes, patterns in the sand, combined with drawing, painting and photography are what I use for my installations.”

Carey is an award-winning artist who has exhibited in museums and art centers throughout the United States. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, Carey earned a bachelor’s degree in Exhibit Design from California State University Long Beach and worked a 40-year career that included designing, installing and curating exhibits for organizations across the country.

For more information about Philip Carey, visit his website at www.strangeartofphilipcarey.com.

For more information about the exhibit or other arts initiatives at KCC, contact the College’s Arts and Communications office at 269-965-4126.

For more news about Kellogg Community College, view our latest press releases online at http://daily.kellogg.edu/category/news-releases.

KCC seeking members for Bruin Bots youth robotics team

Kellogg Community College invites all area sixth- through ninth-graders to join the Bruin Bots, a youth robotics team that builds and programs robots for competitions with other teams around the state.

Team practices are underway now and run from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays through Dec. 15 at KCC’s Regional Manufacturing Technology Center campus, located at 405 Hill Brady Road in Battle Creek; participants may start at any time as space allows. Participation is free and requires no special skills or knowledge.

In addition to practices, participants will compete as a team at multiple regional robotics competitions including the FIRST Tech Challenge, which may qualify them to apply for special college scholarships through the FIRST Scholarship Program.

Space on the Bruin Bots team is limited, and spots will be filled on a first come, first served basis.

To register for the Bruin Bots, call 269-965-4134 or email brennana@kellogg.edu. A registration form is available online at www.kellogg.edu/bruin-bots.

For more news about Kellogg Community College, view our latest press releases online at http://daily.kellogg.edu/category/news-releases.

ITT Tech students: Continue your technical education at KCC

The recent announcement of ITT Technical Institute closures around the country has left some former ITT Tech students confused and uncertain about their educational future. Kellogg Community College is here to help such students transition their technical education studies to KCC as seamlessly as possible.

KCC’s Registrar’s office will determine the appropriate equivalencies between ITT Tech and KCC courses for each student and can help former ITT Tech students along in their transfer process. Additionally, KCC Business and Information Technology Program Director Mike Gagnon is the main contact for former ITT Tech students interested in receiving Experiential Learning Credit.

Former ITT Tech students interested in continuing or beginning their education at KCC should contact the College’s Admissions office at 269-965-4153 or at adm@kellogg.edu. Gagnon may be reached at 269-565-7884 or at gagnonm@kellogg.edu.

Some Computer Engineering Technology courses offered at KCC that might be of interest to former ITT Tech students looking to continue their education at KCC include:

  • CET 230: Local Area Networking 1 – Network+, which covers CompTIA Network+ certification preparation
  • CET 235: Cisco Networking 1; CET 236: Cisco Networking 2; CET 275: Cisco Networking 3; and CET 276: Cisco Networking 4, which cover Cisco Certified Network Administrator (CCNA) certification preparation
  • CET 250: Security+, which covers CompTIA Security + certification preparation
  • CET 260: A+ Computer Diagnostics and Repair, which covers CompTIA A+ certification preparation
  • CET 278: Fundamentals of Wireless LANs, which covers Cisco 9EO-581 certification preparation
  • CET 282: Operating Systems – UNIX, which covers CompTIA Linux+ certification preparation

For more information about Information Technology programs at KCC, including Computer-Aided Drafting and Design; Computer Engineering Technology; Graphic Design; Office Information Technology and other programs, visit www.kellogg.edu/information-technology.

To apply to enroll in classes at KCC, visit www.kellogg.edu/step1. Registration for Spring 2017 classes opens Oct. 24; click here to view a list of classes offered at KCC during the Spring 2017 semester.

The Federal Student Aid office of the U.S. Department of Education has set up a Web page for former ITT students outlining how they may continue their education, retrieve their student records, and more. Former ITT Tech students may visit this page for more information atstudentaid.gov/ITT.

Here’s a list of classes offered at KCC’s Grahl Center campus in Coldwater this fall

Kellogg Community College is offering nearly 70 sections of three dozen different classes at the College’s Grahl Center campus in Coldwater this fall.

Classes available cover a wide variety of topics ranging from accounting and business to art and education to nursing and psychology, and much more! Courses include:

  • ACCO 101 & 102: General Accounting
  • ART 211: Art Appreciation
  • BIOL 101: Biological Science
  • BIOL 201: Human Anatomy
  • BIOL 202: Human Physiology
  • BUAD 101: Introduction to Business
  • BUAD 131: Principles of Management
  • BUAD  201: Business Law
  • BUAD 213: Business Statistics
  • CHEM 100: Fundamentals of Chemistry
  • COMM 101: Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
  • CRJU 221: Ethical Problem Solving in Policing
  • ECE 224: Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  • ECE 231: Early Childhood Literacy
  • ECON 202: Principles of Economics (Micro)
  • EDUC 240: Education Trends
  • ENGL 151 & 152: Freshman Composition
  • GEOG 100: Physical Geography
  • HIST 103: American Foundations
  • HIST 201: Global History to 1500
  • LITE 105: Introduction to Literature
  • MATH 102: Practical Algebra
  • MATH 105: Beginning Algebra
  • MATH 115 Math for Liberal Arts
  • MATH 125: College Algebra
  • MUSI 104: Community Chorus
  • NURS 105: Nursing Assistant Training Program
  • PHIL 201: Introduction to Philosophy
  • PSYC 201: Introduction to Psychology
  • PSYC 220: Developmental Psychology
  • SERV 200: Service Learning
  • SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCI 202: Social Problems
  • TSEN 65: Basic Writing
  • TSEN 95: Writing Improvement

For a complete list of Fall 2016 semester classes offered at KCC’s Grahl Center, visit www.kellogg.edu and click on “Class Schedules” in the top menu to search for sections.

Fall 2016 classes begin Aug. 25 and end Dec. 12. For information about signing up for fall classes, visit www.kellogg.edu/registration. For more information about KCC’s Grahl Center campus in Coldwater, visit www.kellogg.edu/grahl.

Here’s a list of classes offered at KCC’s EAC campus in Albion this fall

Kellogg Community College is offering more than two dozen sections of more than 20 different classes at the College’s Eastern Academic Center campus in Albion this fall.

Classes available cover a wide variety of topics ranging from accounting and business to history and math to nursing and psychology, and much more! Courses include:

  • ACCO 101: General Accounting
  • ART 211: Art Appreciation
  • BUAD 101: Introduction to Business
  • BUAD 104: Business Correspondence
  • BUAD 131: Principles of Management
  • COMM 101: Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
  • ECON 201: Principles of Economics (Macro)
  • ENGL 151: Freshman Composition
  • HIST 103: American Foundations
  • HIST 201: Global History to 1500
  • HUSE 101: Introduction to Human Services
  • MATH 102: Practical Algebra
  • MATH 105: Beginning Algebra
  • MATH 125: College Algebra
  • MUSI 211: Music Appreciation
  • NURS 105: Nursing Assistant Training Program
  • OIT 100: Introduction to Computer Information Systems
  • PSYC 201: Introduction to Psychology
  • SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology
  • TSEN 95: Writing Improvement
  • TSEN 105: Learning Strategies

For a complete list of Fall 2016 semester classes offered at KCC’s Eastern Academic Center, visit www.kellogg.edu and click on “Class Schedules” in the top menu to search for sections.

Fall 2016 classes begin Aug. 25 and end Dec. 12. For information about signing up for fall classes, visit www.kellogg.edu/registrationFor more information about KCC’s Eastern Academic Center campus in Albion, visit www.kellogg.edu/eastern.

Here’s a list of classes offered at KCC’s Fehsenfeld Center campus in Hastings this fall

Kellogg Community College is offering more than 40 sections of three dozen different classes at the College’s Fehsenfeld Center campus in Hastings this fall.

Classes available cover a wide variety of topics ranging from accounting and business to art and education, history, math, science, psychology and much more! Courses include:

  • ACCO 101: General Accounting
  • ART 211: Art Appreciation
  • BIOL 99: Preparation for Biology
  • BIOL 101: Biological Science
  • BIOL 201: Human Anatomy
  • BUAD 101: Introduction to Business
  • BUAD 115: Global Business
  • BUAD  202: Business Law
  • BUAD 251: Principles of Marketing
  • CHEM 100: Fundamentals of Chemistry
  • COMM 101: Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
  • CRJU 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • ECE 224: Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  • ECE 231: Early Childhood Literacy
  • ECON 201: Principles of Economics (Macro)
  • ECON 202: Principles of Economics (Micro)
  • ENGL 151 & 152: Freshman Composition
  • HIST 103: American Foundations
  • HIST 201: Global History to 1500
  • MATH 102: Practical Algebra
  • MATH 105: Beginning Algebra
  • MATH 125: College Algebra
  • MUSI 211: Music Appreciation
  • PHIL 201: Introduction to Philosophy
  • PSYC 201: Introduction to Psychology
  • PSYC 220: Developmental Psychology
  • SCIE 100: Environmental Science
  • SERV 200: Service Learning
  • SOCI 201: Introduction to Sociology
  • SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish
  • TSEN 65: Basic Writing
  • TSEN 95: Writing Improvement
  • TSMA 25: Basic Math
  • TSMA 45: Pre-Algebra
  • TSRE 55: Basic College Reading

For a complete list of Fall 2016 semester classes offered at KCC’s Fehsenfeld Center, visit www.kellogg.edu and click on “Class Schedules” in the top menu to search for sections.

Fall 2016 classes begin Aug. 25 and end Dec. 12. For information about signing up for fall classes, visit www.kellogg.edu/registrationFor more information about KCC’s Fehsenfeld Center campus in Hastings, visit www.kellogg.edu/fehsenfeld.

Revised orientation for online students is more flexible, takes less time to complete

New changes to Kellogg Community College’s Online Learner Orientation will make registering for online classes easier and more efficient for students looking to take online classes at KCC this fall.

The following revisions have been made to the Online Learner Orientation:

  • Students may register for online classes while simultaneously registering for the Online Learner Orientation. Previously the orientation had to be completed before students could register for an online class.
  • Students must complete the Online Learner Orientation within 48 hours of the start of their online class or they will be dropped from their online class for that semester. Previously students couldn’t register for an online class until the orientation was complete.
  • The content of the Online Learner Orientation has been revised and more focused, taking students approximately 15 minutes to complete. Previously the orientation took approximately two hours to complete.

Students registered for an online class at KCC will be notified periodically about their Online Learner Orientation completion status.

For more information about Online Learner Orientation, contact KCC’s Learning Technologies offices at learntec@kellogg.edu. For information about registering for Fall 2016 classes at KCC, visitwww.kellogg.edu/registration.

KCC, BACC train for the future with new robotics, mechatronics equipment in Coldwater

It’s a rainy Thursday morning in Coldwater, and a trio of high school seniors inside the Branch Area Careers Center huddles around a large plexiglass box. Kyle Myers, of Reading High School, holds a tablet-sized controller as Nick Pierucki, of Coldwater High, points at the screen, giving instructions.Mason Whitney, of Quincy High School, looks on.

While their peers are in classrooms at their respective high schools taking tests and doing bookwork, the three BACC students are getting valuable hands-on experience for their future careers, programming a robot. They’re programming this one – a waist-high, bright yellow Fanuc 200iD/4S short-arm robot – to play tic-tac-toe.

The robot is similar to one of a half dozen installed at the center via a state grant last year that provided more than a million dollars in new equipment for use by BACC and Kellogg Community College robotics and industrial technology/mechatronics students.

Myers says he wants to go into industrial maintenance, working in both electrical and robotics maintenance as a career, and that the experience he’s had working with the equipment at the BACC has been valuable.

“Learning how to program the robot gives me more insight into how to fix the robot, knowing how it moves,” he said. “And it makes me a higher asset to most companies if I know how to program the robot and fix it; they don’t have to hire two separate guys to do the job.”

Pierucki, who wants to be an electrical engineer, feels similar.

“There’s a lot of math in the programming and there’s a lot of math in engineering, and it’s not much different working with the robots and electricity parts,” Pierucki says. “It’s just a big opportunity for us.”

Training the future

The new equipment at the BACC, which includes several industrial electronics and wiring trainers in addition to the new robots, was purchased and installed over the course of the past year throughCommunity College Skilled Trades Equipment Program (CCSTEP) funds granted to KCC to make student and worker training in the communities the College serves quicker and more comprehensive and efficient. KCC operates its Grahl Center regional campus next door to the BACC, and offers training in industrial electricity/electronics, machining technology, maintenance and robotics at the center.

Ben Miller, manager of the BACC Robotics Program, says the center didn’t have a robotics program before the new equipment was installed. With KCC’s CCSTEP funds, the center was able to partner with the College to add the robotics element as an extension to its other programming for students interested in fields like mechanical or electrical engineering.

Electric automation students at the center incorporate input/output programming that teaches the robots how to react when they receive certain signals, Miller says, gesturing toward students wiring I/O switch boxes in a space adjacent to the robotics area. CAD students can design end-of-arm tooling or parts to pick up, while welders learn how to use the robots for robotic welding.

“It opens it up; students can have a lot more access to the technology and the automation side,” Miller says. “We get a good mix of future engineers.”

The BACC primarily serves high schoolers during the day, and high school robotics program graduates at the center will leave with a Fanuc Material Handling Certification they can use to “jump right onto a robot” in the workforce, Miller says. The BACC sees adult ed students from KCC in the evenings.

“The students that come in for that program are usually coming from industry, and out in their factory they might have a robot and not know how to use it, or might have very minimal training in how to operate and modify programs, and so we get those students in here and they’re able to take what they know and then just build on it,” Miller says. “I’ve had students who I’ve shown very, very small processes, and they’ll go back and they’ll send me a video and say, hey, look what I can do now. It’s just amazing to see the growth.”

The cutting edge

Several pieces of equipment available at the BACC are mirrored at KCC’s Regional Manufacturing Technology Center in Battle Creek, where Tom Longman, director of the RMTC, explains the value of the growing field of robotics.

“Robots do things that people might not want to do,” Longman says. “Repetitive tasks or things that are dangerous that we don’t want to subject people to, or movements someone might have a hard time doing.”

Tasks like these might involve picking up hot die casts out of molds and putting them in a quench tank for cooling, trimming metal or categorizing bulk parts, he says. Robots can assemble, weld and inspect materials through vision systems that detect color, shape and size.

Training on such robots offered at KCC and incorporated into several of the College’s Industrial Trades programs can help students become robotics technicians or industrial maintenance technicians or mechanics, working in a variety of environments ranging from kitchens to the ocean.

“It’s exciting work, it’s interesting work, it’s cutting edge,” Longman says, pointing out an RC8 robot used to train Denso employees at the center. “It’s so broad and diverse the things they can do.”

Robb Cohoon, an Industrial Trades instructor at the College who also heads KCC’s Bruin Bots robotics program for area youth, agrees.

“It’s the future; we’re just at the beginning of it,” Cohoon says, emphasizing the need for skilled workers to receive robotics training if they’re worried about the potential for displacement as automation expands. Skilled workers are needed to build, maintain and fix the robots, Cohoon says, and to program them to do the tasks that make them so valuable.

“Some plants have two robots, some have 200,” Longman adds, “and someone has to take care of those.”

Clemens Food Group training

The state’s CCSTEP funds provided more than $178,000 worth of robotics equipment and more than $732,000 worth of additional industrial technology/mechatronics equipment for KCC and BACC programming at the BACC. A 25 percent match of $44,512 from the BACC and KCC for the robotics portion and $183,028 from KCC, the Branch County Intermediate School District, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, and the Workforce Development Agency brought the total investment in new equipment to more than $1.1 million.

The latter matching funds were batched through Community Block Grant funds provided to Clemens Food Group, which is building a 600,000-square-foot processing facility in Coldwater that will create an estimated 830 jobs within the next few years. KCC and the BACC are partnering with the facility to offer a series of robotics and mechatronics courses this fall designed to train students on the expertise and equipment needed for employment at Clemens when it begins operations in late 2017.

KCC is hosting sign-up events in late June and early July for students interested in such training to complete an application, fill out financial aid forms and meet with instructors to map out a course plan. For more information or to RSVP, contact KCC staff at grahl@kellogg.edu or 517-278-3300. The sign-up events will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, June 29, and from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 6, at KCC’s Grahl Center, located at 125 Seeley St. in Coldwater.

For more information about industrial trades training at KCC, visit www.kellogg.edu/industrial-trades. For more information about training available at the BACC, visithttp://branchisd.org/bacc.

The equipment highlighted above is just some of the new KCC training equipment purchased via the College’s $2.1 million package of CCSTEP resources. For more information about new equipment purchased through CCSTEP funds for KCC, click here.

Pictured in the above photo, Kyle Myers, of Reading High School, looks on at the BACC as Nick Pierucki, of Coldwater High, points at the screen of a tablet-sized robotics controller, giving instructions. 

KCC Radiography Program updates lab with new state-of-the-art X-ray machine

Kellogg Community College received more than $2 million for updates to select occupational programs at the College via the state’s Community College Skilled Trades Equipment Program last year, and among the package of CCSTEP resources were funds for a new X-ray machine for KCC’s Radiography Program.

The new equipment, funded through nearly $50,000 in CCSTEP funds and a 25 percent funds match of $12,449 from KCC, will help future radiographers studying at KCC practice pre-clinical skills on campus. Or, as noted in the original CCSTEP grant proposal, the new equipment will “allow students to increase skill sets and achieve mastery on contemporary equipment and in a setting that encourages repeated practice of high stakes clinical skills in a low-stakes learning environment.”

Chris VandenBerg, Allied Health director at KCC, said the new piece of equipment replaced equipment that was more than 30 years old and becoming difficult to repair. She explains the value of the new equipment to current and future KCC Radiography students in detail below.

Question: What does the new equipment do?

VandenBerg: The new piece of equipment is comparable to what is used in the clinical environment. We have wonderful community partners who support our program and in the past have donated their used equipment to us. Unfortunately, some of that equipment can be older, somewhat outdated and can become difficult to repair.

Having the opportunity to purchase the latest technology in the industry gives KCC the ability to better assist our students in transferring the knowledge learned in the classroom and lab to the live environment.

Q: How does the new equipment benefit students and instructors? What can they do that they couldn’t do before? What does it add experience-wise to the Radiography program?

V: The new equipment benefits both the student and faculty by being state-of-the-art and very comparable to the equipment used in the live environment. This particular piece of equipment has a control panel that sets the amount of X-ray to be used, with the latest automated features that Radiography students will encounter in the clinical setting.

This is very helpful to correlate the theory of calculating the correct dose/amount needed of radiation to create the image. With fast pace of advances in technology in the health care environment, this new equipment really aids our students in understanding the theory taught in lectures and helps them translate it into the clinical setting.

Q: Why is the new equipment important for the program and its graduates?

V: Medical imaging has changed dramatically over my 30-plus years in the profession. A big example of this is that we no longer use film in the industry; it is all digital now. With that drastic change came many big advances in the technology and capabilities in medical imaging, and the education and knowledge offered on how to use these new tools needs to be up to speed. This equipment accomplishes that goal for our Radiography students.

Admission to KCC’s Radiography Program is selective, and KCC accepts just 20 students into the program each year. For more information about KCC’s Radiography Program, including information about radiography careers and completion and credentialing exam pass rates for recent KCC Radiography Program graduates, visit www.kellogg.edu/radiography.

For more information about new equipment purchased through CCSTEP funds for KCC, click here.

Pictured in the photo above, KCC Radiography students Ashley Ledford and Joshua Pitchure demonstrate the use of the program’s new X-ray machine, while Radiography student Jennifer Whitaker acts as their patient.

KCC Dental Clinic upgrades include new patient chairs, improved workflow

Kellogg Community College students and community members alike are benefiting from the most significant upgrades to the college’s Dental Hygiene Clinic in two decades.

Updates at the clinic – through their educational program, Dental Hygiene students provide dental services to the public – include 10 dental units, new flooring and renovations that have significantly improved efficiency and workflow since completed in August.

The new dental units include new patient chairs, new unit arms with suction and water functionality, new ergonomic operator stools for the student hygienists and new LED overhead lights, updates KCC Dental Hygiene Director Bridget Korpela said were much needed to bring dated equipment up to the standards of a modern dental environment. The old equipment was well-cared for, she said, but was starting to fail in increments.

“Any time any of that equipment breaks down we have 10 students that are relying on that for their learning experience,” Korpela said. “If you lose an appointment because your equipment doesn’t work, then that’s an imposition on the student, it’s an imposition on the patient, and things can’t happen for learning like they should.”

The older lighting systems would dim over time, for example, or need to be repaired completely, leaving students with little or no light for their appointments. In some cases, patient chairs would actually get stuck with patients lying down in an up position off the floor, and patients would have to climb out. The new equipment, Korpela said, removes such issues from the learning environment.

“Students can rely on it; the aggravation level goes away and you can focus on learning,” Korpela said. “You don’t have to be concerned and stressed about equipment not working.”

The changes haven’t gone unnoticed by the college’s second-year Dental Hygiene students, who used the old equipment in the clinic through their first year in the program and have been using the new equipment though the current academic year. Second-year Dental Hygiene student Lauren Rubley, who graduated in May, said in addition to making work easier on students, the equipment does a better job of serving their patients.

“The chairs themselves have presets, they’re a lot smoother, and the light just turns itself on,” Rubley said. “We get a lot of elderly patients in and a lot of disabled patients in, and there’s a huge benefit just in how the chairs lay back easier.”

She also noted the option to adjust the headrest of the new chairs so that patients in wheelchairs can just back their wheelchairs to the headrest; previously such patients had to be transferred to the dental chair or students would have to try and make space in their station to actually work on the patients in their wheelchairs.

“It makes it better to work on all patients, and also patients like it a lot,” Rubley said. “We get a lot of rave reviews.”

Adding to the benefits afforded by the dental units are new flooring and renovations that included moving the clinic’s sterilization center – where students clean their instruments – from a station in the center of the clinic to another room. Even though the clinic itself hasn’t expanded, Korpela said the room looks much bigger.

“The perception is that it’s much bigger, which is helpful for everybody, to feel like you have more room,” Korpela said. “And when you move that sterilization area, too, that combination really opened it up.”

The bulk of the updates to the KCC Dental Hygiene Clinic have been funded through a packages of resources bundled together via the state’s Community College Skilled Trades Equipment Program, which provided KCC with $2.1 million last year for new equipment to make student and worker training more efficient in the communities served by the college. CCSTEP funds totaling approximately $157,000 were utilized for the Dental Hygiene Clinic upgrades, along with a 25 percent funds match of approximately $40,000 paid for by the college.

Dr. Jan Karazim, dean of Workforce Development at KCC and project manager for general oversight of KCC’s CCSTEP initiatives, praised the program for making it possible to equip KCC’s Dental Hygiene Program with “current and relevant technology used in contemporary dental practices.”

“The purpose of CCSTEP is to enhance occupational education and training offered through Michigan community colleges by helping these institutions purchase equipment that helps them prepare skilled workers to fill current and projected labor needs in Michigan,” Karazim said. “KCC’s Dental Hygiene graduates are entering a high-wage, high-demand career field where the recent updates to their Dental Hygiene Clinic will serve them well when entering the modern work environment.”

For more information about KCC’s Dental Hygiene Clinic, including a list of services offered to community patients, visit www.kellogg.edu/dental-clinic. For more information about KCC’s Dental Hygiene Program, visit www.kellogg.edu/dentalhygiene or contact KCC’s Admissions office at adm@kellogg.edu or 269-965-4153.

For more information about new equipment purchased through CCSTEP funds for KCC, click here.

Pictured in the above photo, KCC Dental Hygiene student Alexis Kosten works on “patient” and Dental Hygiene student Addie Etelamaki during class in KCC’s Dental Hygiene Clinic.

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