Archives

Infant and Toddler Care

This course provides students with experience in programming, designing, and sequencing learning experiences for children ages newborn to three including providing secure learning environments, and how space and equipment influence children. Students learn how culture affects young children’s development, and how the state of Michigan licensing regulations may pertain to infant and toddler. Students are required to complete 16 hours of field experience outside of scheduled class times. Lab Fee

Early Childhood Environments

This course provides hands-on experience in selecting, preparing, and presenting appropriate curriculum for children in licensed preschool and before-and-after school care settings. Specific areas of study include the development of appropriate learning experiences using music, art, dramatic play, outdoor play, fine and gross motor skills, and literacy. Students learn how to plan appropriate routines. Students are required to complete 16 hours of field experience outside of scheduled class times. Lab Fee

Young Children with Special Needs

This course examines young children with disabilities and a variety of methods to help integrate them successfully into a program. Emphasis is on teaching modalities, curriculum, learning materials, environment, and personnel. The evaluation of an Individual Education Plan will be examined. This course is based on NAEYC standards for early childhood associate degree programs. Each student will be required to spend 4-6 clock hours completing field experience outside of scheduled class times which may include working with young children, families, and early childhood professionals. Lab Fee

Child Care Administration

This course is based on NAEYC standards for administration of child care centers. Students examine the child care administrator’s role in directing successful early childhood centers.  Topics include safety, child care licensing laws, sound health and nutrition practices, business practices, communication skills, professionalism, personnel management, policy development, accreditation standards, and ethical decision making. Each student will be required to spend one to two clock hours completing field experience outside of scheduled class times which may include working with young children, families, and early childhood professionals.

Intentional Teaching in Early Childhood

Students learn the components of intentional teaching to ensure all children reach their full potential and are school-ready. Students learn how to use reflection and purposeful planning to ensure each child acquires the skills needed to be successful based on individual assessment. Students learn how to balance child and adult-guided experiences to promote effective learning across developmental domains. Students will be introduced to NAEYC ethical standards, coaching, mentoring, and service learning conceptual models in their respective relationships to early childhood education. Each student is required to spend 4-6 clock hours completing field experience outside of scheduled class times which may include working with young children, families, and early childhood professionals.

Positive Relationships with Families

Students learn how to establish and maintain positive relationships with diverse families of young children. Effective communication strategies are emphasized encouraging equal partnerships with families. Advocacy for families is explored. This course is based on NAEYC standards of child development practices.

Oral Pathology

This course provides fundamental instruction of the general pathological processes of inflammation and repair, immune response, neoplasia, developmental disturbances and systemic disease. Particular focus is on the etiology and clinical manifestations of pathology of the head and neck region. The course uses case studies to assist in identifying clinical entities and recognizing the relevance of findings to dental hygiene treatment planning. Successful completion of this course is mandatory for continuing the program.

Community Dentistry 2

This course is a continuation of Community Dentistry 1 with more emphasis on community oral health education, epidemiology, and disease prevention. This course is designed to prepare students to meet specific oral health needs of community groups as distinct from the traditional clinical approach that is designed to meet the needs of individual patients. Students will complete a community health project identified in Community Dentistry 1 that will include assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating a program for a target population. Students will also learn the basic principles of biostatistics and research design. Successful completion of this course is mandatory for continuing in the program. Lab Fee

Nutrition

This course is a study in the science of nutrition principles and their application. Students will learn about the important role that nutrients play in maintaining general and oral health. Using strategies for disease prevention and health promotion, students will begin to develop and implement the skills needed to improve their own diet and to provide dietary counseling for patients. Successful completion of this course is mandatory for continuing in the program.

Pharmacology

This course is a study of drugs with special emphasis on those used in dentistry. It focuses on the physical and chemical properties of drugs by groups, dosages, therapeutic effects, and the use of local anesthetics and nitrous oxide pain control modalities. The course also includes the management of medical emergencies relative to the administration of local anesthetics. Successful completion of this course is mandatory for continuing in the program.