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College Physics 2

This a trigonometry-based, lecture and laboratory course that includes a study of electricity, magnetism, light and modern physics.

College Physics 1

This is a non-calculus based lecture and laboratory course dealing with the major areas of physics including measurement, mechanics, heat and waves. The basic principles of these topics are studied in terms of their applications. Experience in trigonometry is recommended but not required. [48-48-96] Lab Fee

Introduction to MRI Physics

This course is designed to prepare students interested in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Program. The course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of physics. Topics will include mechanics, thermodynamics, atomic structure, electric and magnetic fields, and radiation. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals necessary to understand methods of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Independent Study

This course is an opportunity for the interested student with a good scholastic record to pursue independently the study of a subject while under the direction of a member of the professional staff. Subjects are chosen and arrangements are made to meet the needs of individual students.

Independent Study

This course is an opportunity for the interested student with a good scholastic record to pursue independently the study of a subject while under the direction of a member of the professional staff. Subjects are chosen and arrangements are made to meet the needs of individual students.

Cults and New Religious Movements

Countless groups, old and new, mark the religious landscape in our culture. Students will critically examine the characteristics of a cult, and compare different types of cults and movements in our study. Analysis for each religious group will focus on its history and development, primary theological doctrines, ethical issues, and apologetics in terms of how mainstream traditions have responded. The goal is to expand understanding of philosophic and religious concepts, and equip students to evaluate them.

Topics in Philosophy

This course will discuss particular issues, topics, or authors in philosophy with a focus on introducing students to a cross-cultural perspective. Topics to be studied will change from semester to semester.

Survey of the Bible

The Bible is the most widely distributed and most widely read book in the world. We will analyze the Hebrew Bible and the New Testaments in the areas of philosophy, theology, ethics, and spirituality, including its varying impact on ancient to contemporary thought. We will consider society in biblical times, culture, history, and archeology in discussing and interpreting the writings. We will make connections to world history as we critically examine how the Bible came to be and compare different methods of interpretation.

World Religions

Students will develop an understanding of the basic tenets of major theistic systems, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Students will explore how they approach these philosophic subjects: systematic consistency, the nature of deity, the response to atheism, the role of religious experience, ethics, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, and others. Students will critically examine and compare many distinct world views in their analysis.

Introduction to Ethics

Ethics is the philosophic study of moral values. These questions will be explored: What makes actions right or wrong? Can moral beliefs or values be proven or evaluated? What values of life should we strive for? Should we blame or punish people for their actions? Can rights be defined or justified? And is individual liberty more important than collective authority or societal needs? Practical applications to medicine, law, business, and world affairs will be made. Humanities credit.